A Little Cabin Soars With Incredible Views

You'll want to take a look at "A Little Cabin Soars With Incredible Views," not only does it sit in the best location, but every detail was well thought out. This tiny lakeside cabin proves the perfect place to take the granddaughters and spend quality time with family.

This little cabin is the perfect place to spend summers and holidays away from it all. Inside the 1,100 square feet little cabin feels spacious thanks to the ceiling heights that go from 9 feet in the kitchen to a soaring 12 feet in the main living area. The ascending fir ceiling tops stone walls that bookend the space, and durable concrete floors handle wet flip flops and snowy boots with equal ease. At the centre of the tiny cabin, there is a bank of windows that wraps around to meet the stone on either side with the biggest expanse of glass placed front and centre to frame up the mountain and lake tableau. The largest pane is at eye level and there are smaller units above and below for ventilation, and because the house is built into the hillside, the cool earth provides air conditioning. Passive energy put to good use. This is a cabin that you will want to see, lake view and all.

A log house (or log home) is structurally identical to a log cabin (a house typically made from logs that have not been milled into conventional lumber). The term log cabin is not preferred by most contemporary builders, as it generally refers to a smaller, more rustic log house such as a hunting cabin in the woods, or a summer cottage. Log construction was the most common building technique in large regions of Sweden, Finland, Norway, the Baltic states and Russia, where straight and tall coniferous trees, such as pine and spruce, were readily available. It was also widely used for vernacular buildings in Eastern Central Europe, the Alps, the Balkans and parts of Asia, where similar climatic conditions were present. In the warmer and more westerly regions of Europe, where deciduous trees were more dominant, timber framing was favoured instead and proved to be a smart style of house.

Some of the different types of log homes can include; handcrafted, which are typically made of logs that have been peeled, but essentially unchanged from their original appearance as trees; hewn logs, logs that are hewn by an axe to an oval, hexagonal, octagonal or rectangular section; sawn logs, logs that are sawn to a standard width, but with their original heights; milled (also known as machine profiled), made with a log house moulder, made with logs that have been run through a manufacturing process which then converts them into timbers which are consistent in size and appearance. Handcrafted log houses have been built for centuries in Scandinavia, Russia and Eastern Europe, and were typically built using only an axe and knife.

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